If you cannot see images at all on my site click here for an explanation
Home
Federal Government/Horses
Kids/Big Kids Corner
First Posted: Occt 114, 2013
Oct 14, 2013

Black Jack/Caisson Horse/Most Famous Riderless Horse

(The Caparisoned Horse is the Riderless Horse that walks behind the Casket)

A riderless horse or caparisoned horse (in reference to its ornamental coverings, which have a detailed protocol of their own) is a single horse, without a rider, and with boots reversed in the stirrups, which sometimes accompanies a funeral procession. The horse follows the caisson carrying the casket. A riderless horse can also be featured in military parades to symbolize fallen soldiers. In Australia for example, it is traditional for a riderless horse known as the 'Lone Charger' to lead the annual Anzac Day marches.

"...The Caisson Platoon has been the home of the Army's oldest and most famous horse - 'Black Jack,' foaled January 19, 1947, and coming to Ft. Myer from Fort Reno, Oklahoma, on November 22nd, 1952. 'Black Jack' had the honor of being named after General of the Armies John J. 'Black Jack' Pershing.

'Black Jack' was the last of the Quartermaster - issue horses branded with the Army's U.S. brand (on the left shoulder} and his Army serial number 2V56 (on the left side of his neck).

'Black Jack' had taken part not only in funerals of Presidents John F. Kennedy, Herbert Hoover, Lyndon B. Johnson, and General Douglas MacArthur. but literally thousands of others in Arlington Cemetery during his 24 years of service with the Old Guard.

'Black Jack' ended his dedicated, dignified military career on February 6, 1976, and is buried on the parade ground of Fort Myer's Summerall Field." 1/3 Battalion HHC Caisson Platoon


The Headstone of Black Jack

For More Information:

Riderless Horse
Federal Government/Horses

Home
Kids/Big Kids Corner